Exploring More Dark Web Search Engines

Unbeknownst to me up until today, there are even more Tor search engines which can help you wade through the “ominous” dark web.

Granted, these vary in quality quite a bit. Some haven’t indexed as many links, while others don’t seem to return relevant results (which probably has a lot to do with their search algorithms, more than anything).

One of the search engines I just began experimenting with is called Poopak. That name would’ve made me snicker in first grade, but I’m a bit older than that now. It can be found at http://3cuarxyaxke2hmlk.onion.

poopak_edited

One of the things I found interesting about Poopak is that it lists the number of possible onions (1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176) as opposed to the number of alive onion pages (3274). That seems ridiculous when you think about it, doesn’t it?

As they said on All Onion Services, “…there aren’t very many online onion services.” Of course, these numbers can change, but the types of sites that you’ll find won’t change much.

I tried some of my usual searches on Poopak, like “video games,” “red rooms,” and “forum.” To my surprise, “red room” didn’t return any results! Maybe they decided to filter out that search? I’m disappointed.

red_room_1

I had much better luck when typing in “forum,” or “links.” Still, it looks as though Poopak hasn’t indexed as many onions as some of the tried and true search engines, like not Evil. At present, it seems to be rather hit-and-miss when it comes to finding specific results, but you can give it a shot if you like.

haystak

haystak_edited

haystak calls itself “the darknet’s largest search engine,” which is quite a feat, considering how many Tor hidden services there are, and how much competition it now has. It can be found at http://haystakvxad7wbk5.onion

At the time of this writing, it says, “We’ve indexed 1.5 billion pages over 260,000 onions (including historical onions).” Does this mean that the original Silk Road is on it, for instance? That would be interesting.

A search for “silk road” turned up mostly results for Silk Road 3.1, which is still active at the moment. My intention, of course, was to try to find a cached copy of the one and only Silk Road (yes, that one), but I was unsuccessful on the first try.

As it turns out, when your search results come up, you can also look for cached versions of sites (as on Google), or “historical versions” of sites that have been shut down (like SIGAINT), or just ones that have disappeared for one reason or another.

There’s a catch, though – to access certain content (such as the cached versions of sites), you need to upgrade to a paid account. Hey, nothing on the dark web is for free, right? Still, at least you can use its basic functions without paying.

I haven’t found anything of particular significance on Haystak yet, but that shouldn’t discourage you!

In any case, it sounds to me like the dark web hasn’t completely been “discovered” yet. 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 onions? I’m off to visit all of them!

 

 

 

 

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